P.661 Harold N. Anderson Oil Painting

Harold N. Anderson detail
Harold N. Anderson detail
Harold N. Anderson
Harold N. Anderson
Harold N. Anderson
Harold N. Anderson detailHarold N. Anderson detailHarold N. AndersonHarold N. AndersonHarold N. Anderson
Harold N. Anderson Oil Painting of Children and Circus Clown

Brilliantly Colored and Beautifully Rendered Original Oil by Harold N. Anderson of Children and a Circus Clown, signed l.l, “Harold Anderson”,oil on canvas, hand carved and gilded Guido frame, ca. late 1940’s, original artwork published as a Saturday Evening Post Cover. This original work has never before been offered for sale on the open market. This item is SOLD

SKU: P 661
PRICE: $8900
DIMENSIONS: Image H :16" x 27", Framed H: 21.5" x 32.5"

Harold N. Anderson
( 1894-1973)
American, 20th century

Harold N. Anderson was born in Boston, 1894. He studied at the Fenway School of Illustrative Art with Chase Emerson, Harold Brett and Arthur Spear. He resided in Old Greenwich, CT in the 1940’s and had a very successful career as a highly sought after and accomplished illustrator based in NYC. His work often appeared as the covers of The Saturday Evening Post and many other popular magazines of the day. Creating artwork for national magazines, billboard posters and designing of national advertising campaigns, Harold Anderson was dedicated to illustration and commercial art. Among his many clients were Eli Lilly Pharmaceuticals, Pan American Airlines, an numerous other major corporations and national publications.
He was a member of the Society of Illustrators; The Artist Guild; Old Greenwich Art Association; Westport Art Association. He had a solo exhibition at the Society of Illustrators, 1942. Along with many industry awards and prizes, he was the Director of Carnegie Institute, 1937, 1940, 1942, 1946, 1950-51. Upon his retirement in the late 1950’s he returned to his home state of MA, where he resided in Nahant. He died in 1973.


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